Copycatting in fashion, beauty is more harmful (and prevalent!) than you think

From a young age we are taught that copying our peers’ work is wrong. Their intellectual property–whether it’s a kindergarten macaroni necklace or Pulitzer Prize-winning literature–is just that: their property.

Federal law mandates that intellectual property receives copyright protection from the moment it is fixed in a medium, according to the United States Copyright Office. In short, the second an idea leaves your mind and becomes something tangible (i.e., perceptible to at least one of the five senses), it is copyright protected under U.S. law.

But, that didn’t stop the classroom bully, and it certainly does not stop big-name fashion and beauty retailers. The rise in fashion and beauty bloggers and YouTubers has created a new environment in which dupes can not only breed, but thrive.

Beauty gurus (and aspiring beauty gurus) share countless dupe guides on social media platforms like Pinterest. Dupe guides compare high-end products their low-end counterparts. [source: Pinterest]
“Everyone has gotten so fucking lazy in [the beauty] industry. There. I said it. There are some beautiful things out there that the labs are doing, but no one bothers to do it,” writes Glossible‘s Sonia Roselli.

“Why? Why bother? Copycatting is big business and it’s faster to get to market. There is no better time than now to be in the cosmetics manufacturing game. Cosmetic labs are working at full capacity and some aren’t even taking new customers, thanks to social media.  But because of social media, I find that we are going down a path that is bad for all of us.”

According to Roselli’s post, the biggest names in beauty knockoff products from small brands such as Viseart, Melanie Mills and PPI. Their motive?

“If I were being completely honest, in my opinion, most big cosmetic companies don’t even TRY anymore. And it’s not just the cosmetic companies, it’s the labs and manufacturers too who take direction from these companies.  I imagine the chemists are crying in their glass beakers because they WANT to create innovative products but the companies won’t let them. Why? Because copycatting is big business and easier to do.”

Roselli also notes that copycatting runs rampant in the technology industry, as well, citing Apple’s recent lack of innovation.

“What happened to luxurious textures and colors that were perfect for skin tones? What happened to a brand being known for their foundation colors? What about a brand being known for their skin products? It’s all the same shit just a different day,” Roselli asks.

“To me the beauty industry looks a little something like this: We are the lions and the cosmetic companies just throw us a carcass.”

Viseart’s multicolor eyeshadow palette, which retails on Sephora.com for $80, has been duped by web-based retailer Morphe. Morphe’s so-called Picasso Palette retails for $14.99.

W-7, a UK-based cosmetics company, has not one, but three blatant knockoffs of Urban Decay’s famous Naked eyeshadow palettes. Naked, Naked 2 and Naked 3 retail for $54 each, while W-7’s dupes go for $12.95 each. The company also sells a bronzer called Honolulu ($5.30) eerily similar in color and packaging to Benefit’s Hoola bronzer ($29), a cult favorite.

There is also e.l.f., a drugstore beauty brand also known as Eyes, Lips, Face. Roselli notes the similarities between e.l.f.’s Pink Passion blush ($5.30) and Nars’ Desire blush ($30), and mentions that the brand is a notorious industry-wide copycat.

W-7 In The Buff: Lightly Toasted palette versus Urban Decay’s Naked palette [source: Pinterest]
“Most people don’t realize how or why copycat imitation hurts our industry, or for that matter, even care,” Roselli writes.

“As a pro makeup artist, I can go our right now to any Ulta or Sephora and tell you that 85 percent of all makeup is complete and utter bullshit. Don’t believe me? Go on any Facebook group that caters to professional makeup artists and you will see a surge in going back to old brands…Graftobian, Ben Nye, RCMA just to name a few…Why? Because the big brands are not listening to working pros. They are listening to beauty bloggers.”

While some beauty bloggers and vloggers are truly trustworthy and informative, Roselli insists there are many who are quite the opposite:

“I think [bloggers] have an interesting place in the industry [because they] allow people to discover new products. While a lot of bloggers out there are great (especially the ones that have worked in the industry for years), these aren’t the ones I’m talking about here. I’m talking about people who have no clue about beauty.”

These bloggers care more about making money than they do about creating quality content or sharing what they’ve learned with a larger community.

“Over the last few years, beauty bloggers have become puppets for the cosmetic companies,” Roselli continues.

“Last year, I sat in on a big meeting with some higher up cosmetic level execs who were giving a talk on how they utilize social media influencers.  The story went a little something like this: A very popular Youtube beauty blogger was given $100,000 to blog about a new product that was coming out.  (Yes, you read that correctly: 1 video. 15 minutes long. $100k). But, guess what? Her videos drove over $2 million in sales in one day! As a matter of fact, [in] minutes. [The blogger] said exactly what [the cosmetics company] wanted her to say (in her own words of course).”

As long as cosmetics companies can rely on big-name beauty bloggers and YouTubers, they can continue to make shoddy dupes of high-end products an end up with a pretty spectacular return on investment.

“That means these cosmetic companies can make absolute bullshit products and not care about the actual product they produce because they have beauty bloggers to drive the sales. So, they rip each other’s products, have a pissing match on who can knock it off better and play this game of cat and mouse to see who has the bigger balls,” Roselli writes.

Jenn Im, YouTuber behind Clothes Encounters, sports a slip dress by Necessary Clothing, a trendy fast fashion retailer. [source: Instagram user @imjennim]
Crushed Velvet Zillah Slip Dress in Blush by Are You Am I, $675 [source: Are You Am I]
However, Roselli doesn’t blame any beauty blogger for what they do; in fact, she applauds their ability to be so influential.

“Secretly, I laugh and say, ‘go girl!’ to the beauty blogger and wanna high five her after she hits ‘publish’ on her YouTube channel. It’s this double edge sword that is creating a sea of mediocrity in the marketplace. And who loses? We do, the pro and the consumer. ”

Nonetheless, it is the process in itself that perpetuates the lack of quality products currently on the market; Roselli insists it is a vicious cycle.

“The cosmetic companies watch social media trends, give the masses what the think they want, and use the beauty blogger to promote the sales. What are we left with? Subpar bullshit,” she writes.

“If beauty blogger tells you that the Waffle House yellow foundation she is using is the best thing since Netflix on a cold rainy day, well guess what? People believe her. Then, women are left with crappy products that don’t perform and are constantly shopping for something that works, leaving us in a constant state of searching for the next hero product for ourselves.”

And, the same can be said for fashion. It doesn’t matter anymore what’s on the runway or what’s in the most esteemed fashion magazines. Consumers are more likely lust after looks they see on the most influential bloggers and vloggers, who in large part promote fast fashion (whether they realize it or not!), according to The Fashion Law.

In addition to being a violation of intellectual property, fast fashion negatively impacts both garment workers and the environment, as well as consumers. From an article published in 2014, The Huffington Post notes a number of toxins found in garments from several popular fast fashion retailers.

“According to the Center for Environmental Health, Charlotte Russe, Wet Seal, Forever21 and other popular fast-fashion chains are still selling lead-contaminated purses, belts and shoes above the legal amount, years after signing a settlement agreeing to limit the use of heavy metals in their products,” Shannon Whitehead writes.

“Lead exposure has also been linked to higher rates of infertility in women and increased risks of heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure. Many scientists agree there is no ‘safe’ level of lead exposure for anyone. The lead contamination is all in addition to the pesticides, insecticides, formaldehyde, flame-retardants and other known carcinogens that reside on the clothes we wear.”

[source: takepart.com]
Whitehead also goes on to explain the impacts the fast fashion industry has on the environment:

“The average American throws away over 68 pounds of textiles per year. We’re not talking about clothing being donated to charity shops or sold to consignment stores, that 68 pounds of clothing is going directly into landfills. Because most of our clothing today is made with synthetic, petroleum-based fibers, it will take decades for these garments to decompose.”

Fast fashion retailers also exploit garment workers in developing countries, because these countries do not offer labor laws that protect their workers.

“Industry estimates suggest that 20 to 60 percent of garment production is sewn at home by informal workers, according author Lucy Siegle in her book, To Die For: Is Fashion Wearing Out the World?

While there are machines that can apply sequins and beading that look like handiwork, they are very expensive and must be purchased by the garment factory. According to Siegle, it’s highly unlikely that an overseas factory would invest in the equipment, particularly if the clothing being made is for a value-driven fast-fashion label,” Whitehead continues.

“Carrying out her own investigation, Siegle learned that millions of desperate home-workers are hidden in some of the poorest regions of the world, ‘hunched over, stitching and embroidering the contents of the global wardrobe…in slums where a whole family can live in a single room.’

Often with the help of their children, the home workers sew as fast as they can and for as long as daylight allows to embellish and bedazzle the clothes that end up in our closets. Siegle goes on to say, ‘They live hand to mouth, presided over by middlemen, tyrannical go-betweens who hand over some of the lowest wages in the garment industry.'”

Coachella: music & arts festival or advertising extravaganza?

Friday, April 14 marked Coachella’s 2017 kickoff. With Radiohead, Lady Gaga and Kendrick Lamar headlining, more than 100,000 guests are expected to be in attendance after the Indio City Council voted to raise the cap from 99,000 to 126,000 last year, according to The Desert Sun.

The music and arts festival, which launched in 1999, seems to be filled with guests more interested in advertising and self-promotion than, well, music and the arts. While Empire Polo Club, the event’s venue, is technically in Indio, California, many well-known attendees refer to the location as Palm Springs, a nearby resort town about 2 hours outside Los Angeles by car. Every year it seems the entire West Coast (and half the East Coast) makes its way to Palm Springs for the 3-day-long affair.

Shea Marie and Jess Mair at a party sponsored by Revolve on the first day of Coachella 2017 [source: Instagram user @revolve]
A-list celebs like Emily Ratajkowski made their big Coachella debut this year, along with bloggers and YouTubers like Chiara Ferragni and Lauren Elizabeth. Of course, social media starlets like Hailey Baldwin and Kylie Jenner hinted at their attendance via Instagram, too.

Additionally, several big-name brands headed to Palm Springs for the first festival of the season. Revolve, a web-based retailer, enlisted the help of It girls like Olivia Culpo and Devon Lee Carlson to promote its brand with the hashtag #RevolveFestival. Carlson, along with her younger sister Sydney, also starred on the Snapchat account of online boutique Dolls Kill on Friday, the 14th. Later, the duo attended Galore magazine‘s party together. The sisters Carlson rose to fame after launching Wildflower, a brand of iPhone cases with a fan base that includes Miley Cyrus and Bella Hadid.

YouTube sensations Christine Sydelko and Elijiah Daniel used their humor to rep the popular app Grindr, while model Cait Barker and pals promoted Pretty Little Thing‘s joint party with Paper magazine. Other models in attendance included ARSENIC regular Kylie Rae and Miss California USA 2016 Nadia Grace Mejia.

The hard-partying gang that includes Jess Mair, Shea Marie and Caroline Vreeland were also eager to make their presence at Coachella known via their respective social media platforms.

Victoria’s Secret bombshells Alessandra Ambrosio, Martha Hunt, Josephine Skriver, Romee Strijd and Jasmine Tookes reunited in Palm Springs to promote their hashtag #VSangeloasis. Ambrosio, a VS veteran-turned-swimwear designer, gained a little extra recognition for her namesake brand Ale by Alessandra, sold at, you guessed it, Revolve. Sydney, the younger of the two Carlson sisters, actually sported a knit bikini by Ale on Friday, the 14th.

Rachel Zoe, famed fashion designer, businesswoman and writer behind The Zoe Report, hosted a party dubbed #ZOEasis on Saturday, April 15. Notable attendees like actress Kate Bosworth, supermodel Chanel Iman, blogger Danielle Bernstein (We Wore What) and Zoe herself took to Instagram to show off their looks from the second day of Coachella at Colony 29, a picturesque resort in Palm Springs.

Sydney Carlson in an Ale by Alessandra swimsuit, yellow bandana and blonde wig, captioned “#RevolveFestival” [source: Instagram user @sydneylcarlson]
Nonconformists coined the term, err, hashtag #nochella to mark their opposition to the hype that surrounds the pseudo-event, which Google defines as “an event arranged or brought about merely for the sake of the publicity it generates, especially one designed to appear spontaneous or unplanned.”

To any media savvy person, it is extremely apparent that these celebrities, starlets and brands use Coachella to network both in-person and through social media. Tiresome? Definitely. Unethical? In some cases. But, illegal? Not quite. In fact, the music and arts festival is known to take action against any person or entity that does illegally exploit its name or likeness for advertising/sales purposes.

A month before the festival began, on March 14, Coachella’s parent company Goldenvoice filed a lawsuit in California federal court against Urban Outfitters “for products sold and marketed under the Coachella name,” according to SPIN.

Urban Outfitters, in addition to its namesake stores, owns Free People, an upscale bohemian brand known for its festival-ready looks.

“The lawsuit alleges that Free People sold clothes specifically marketed using the word Coachella, which the festival owns as a trademark, including a ‘Bella Coachella’ line of clothes and a ‘Coachella Valley Tunic’ that has since been pulled off Free People’s website,” SPIN writes.

Furthermore, “the suit alleges that Coachella’s business selling its own branded apparel has suffered due to Free People’s use of the name, and also mentions exclusive contracts with H&M and Pandora jewelry to sell Coachella-licensed apparel.”

Free People and parent company Urban Outfitters, however, attempted to get around possible legal implications with the music and arts festival through “alleged use of  ‘Coachella’ in website URLs, metadata tags and paid Google keywords, so that products that aren’t specifically branded with the name of the festival would still turn up in searches for terms like ‘Coachella outfit.'”

“Incidentally, some parts of the suit read like Coachella is hoping that in addition to deciding the case in its favor, the judge will don his or her own fringe top and floppy hat and join them out in the desert next year,” SPIN reports.

“‘Coachella is about more than just music,’ one line [of the lawsuit] reads. ‘The festival’s venue also includes camping facilities for some 15,000 attendees (complete with a karaoke lounge and a general store), and an amazing selection of food and beverages from a wide range of restaurants. The festival also features an extensive art exhibit which includes many pieces of art (including sculpture and so-called ‘interactive’ art). The music, the food, the art and, of course, the fellowship of other attendees, taken together, makes Coachella more than just a concert to attend—it truly is an experience.’”

From the looks of this lawsuit, it seems Coachella itself has not only acknowledged, but embraced the changing scope of its famous festival. Judging by its promptness in filing lawsuits, Coachella is quick to call out companies illegally cashing in on its trademarked name and copycat-prone likeness.

Free People’s “Coachella Valley Tunic” [source: Pinterest]

What’s in a meme? A look at Gucci’s newest ad campaign

Anyone who uses social media is familiar with the concept of memes. But, no one expected to see memes created and published by an esteemed high-end retailer in lieu of a traditional ad campaign.

According to Google, a meme is “a humorous image, video, piece of text, etc., that is copied (often with slight variations) and spread rapidly by Internet users.” Earlier this month, luxury brand Gucci began utilizing memes to advertise their newest campaign, dubbed #TFWGucci. (For those of you who are not social media savvy, “TFW” is an acronym meaning “the feel when.”)

A scroll through Gucci’s Instagram profile (@gucci) reveals a slew of popular memes repurposed and aimed at its luxury consumers. Many followers were slightly shocked to see Gucci’s memes on their Instagram feeds.

After all, “it’s kind of a well-known fact that the fashion world, particularly the luxury goods industry, has been slow to adopt technology. And then it moved at a snail’s pace to get on social media,” according to Dash Hudson, a company that focuses on Instagram return on investment (ROI) for many big-name brands.

“Luxury labels have been getting by on these platforms thanks to name recognition, but as Instagram evolves and various content trends come and go, it is indeed becoming increasingly imperative for them to start shifting their thinking toward devising social-first strategies.”

By implementing this unique strategy, Gucci instantly set itself apart from its competitors, who do not keep up with social media content trends, such as memes.

“A lot of luxury brands don’t really appear to have a concise social strategy in place and just go about it according to their HQ’s marketing activities,” Dash Hudson continues.

Luxury fashion brands tend steer clear of mainstream trends, on social media or otherwise, in order to maintain their aloof, exclusive personas. So, it is no surprise that it came as, well, a surprise, with the Italian fashion house took on the quirky trend full-force.

[source: Dash Hudson]
The second post of Gucci’s entire meme campaign features a watch showing through a torn suit sleeve, captioned “When you got that new watch and have to show it off.”

With an engagement rate of 1.34 percent, according to Dash Hudson, this post sits in second place among the Gucci account’s top 4 highest performing posts of all time–second only to another #TFWGucci post. The third and fourth place posts are not associated with this campaign.

Gucci’s highest performing post of all-time, by a margin of .21 percent, is a close-up shot of a female model adorned with what appears to be Gucci-inspired temporary tattoos. Her hand and face are covered in drawn-on tags: an Instagram feature used to identify who’s who in a given picture.

“The top 2 memes from the campaign actually became [Gucci’s] top 2 most engaged posts of all-time, dethroning [a snapshot of] the Obamas,” according to Dash Hudson.

[source: Dash Hudson]
Followers are obviously responding well to this unconventional ad campaign, but, like the old phrases says, no good deed goes unpunished. Or, in this case, uncriticized. Fashion enthusiasts all over the world took to social media (of course) to speak out on Gucci’s new campaign.

“I’m not upset that Gucci is making memes now. I’m upset because the memes are bad,” @robesman writes via Twitter.

“These Gucci memes are not funny [and] really not relatable,” adds @erikabowes.

“I’m sure it sounded dope when they were brainstorming, but Gucci’s meme campaign is one of the lamest things I’ve ever seen,” @Sipho_Says writes.

Still, some fans of the brand are unsure how they feel about its new ad campaign.

“Gucci made itself a meme account, and I can’t decide if I love it or hate it,” @rubykburns tweets.

Fast fashion retailers up prices without forgoing unethical practices

Competition among fast fashion retailers has led stores like Forever 21 and Zara to increase prices without cutting back on their shady, inhumane and downright dirty design and production practices, according to The Fashion Law.

“Additionally, [thanks to] the influx and success of other similarly situated web-based retailers like Nasty Gal, Missguided and Pixie Market, the most longstanding fast fashion retailers, such as H&M, Forever 21 and Zara, are being forced to up the ante in order to attract new customers and to hang on to the ones they already have.”

This has caused fast fashion retailers to stock their shelves, both in-store and online, with higher priced goods. Stores known for their cheaply made and cheaply priced versions (i.e., copies) of runway trends now stock $70 trousers and $60 sweaters, without changing the unethical and harmful methods with which they are produced.

Adding variety to their garments in terms of price, quality and, in some cases, brand, The Fashion Law continues, helps fast fashion retailers keep up with competition. Some even stock certain pieces on Revolve.com and other non-fast fashion e-commerce websites.

Alexa Chung wearing Topshop at Topshop Unique’s Fall/Winter 2015 show [source: Who What Wear]
“Another theory centers on the fact that influencers–whether it be Alexa Chung, who has been a proponent of Topshop for years, Olivia Palermo, who is a fan of Zara or Kendall and Kylie Jenner, who have been spotted in Forever 21 and Nasty Gal garments, and have fronted their own collection for PacSun–have increased demand for street brands, thereby driving up prices,” according to The Fashion Law.

In short, it seems high fashion is not as cool or desirable as it once ways. The more young consumers see social media startlets like Kendall and Kylie Jenner shopping–and designing!–fast fashion, the more likely they are to shop fast fashion themselves. Thanks to Kendall Jenner and co., buying cheap is trendy again, and fast fashion’s accessibility ensures young people will keep consuming it.

“One major factor [in the rise of fast fashion prices] has been this real push globally by some of the fashion industry’s most influential bloggers and fashion editors, who have said to the world, ‘it’s OK to mix and match,’” says Simon Lock, owner and CEO of The Lock Group and the pioneering force behind Mercedes-Benz Australia Fashion Week.

“It’s OK to wear a Chloe top with a pair of Zara or H&M jeans. With that has come a certain amount of prestige that is then associated with these fast fashion brands and as a result, consumers are willing to pay more for it.”

Lock is not alone in believing this theory. In fact, it is an idea he has in common with Anna Wintour, esteemed Editor-in-Chief of Vogue magazine.

Bercu on the cover of Wintour’s first Vogue, November 1988 [source: Vogue]
“[Wintour’s] first-ever Vogue cover, from the November 1988 issue, featured model Michaela Bercu in a Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele-styled look of a haute couture Christian Lacroix jacket and stonewashed Guess jeans,” according to The Fashion Law.

The Christian Lacroix jacket, Wintour revealed in 2012, came with a matching skirt. But, Bercu gained a little weight prior to her photoshoot with Vogue–she had been on vacation at home in Israel–so the skirt did not fit her.

“It was so unlike the studied and elegant close-ups that were typical of Vogue’s covers back then, with tons of makeup and major jewelry. This one broke all the rules. Michaela wasn’t looking at you, and worse, she had her eyes almost closed. Her hair was blowing across her face. It looked easy, casual, a moment that had been snapped on the street, which it had been, and which was the whole point,” Wintour continued, reflecting on the issue on Vogue’s 120th anniversary.

“I had just looked at that picture and sensed the winds of change. And you can’t ask for more from a cover image than that.”

It seems Wintour was ahead of her time.

Teen Vogue employees face backlash after making racist remarks on Twitter

Teen Vogue employees Lara Witt and Lauren Duca are under scrutiny after posting racially insensitive and downright hateful remarks on Twitter. On March 18, Witt (@Femmefeministe) wrote, “Also white people are evil. Whiteness is evil.”

Duca’s (@laurenduca) remarks came nearly a year earlier when she wrote, “Friendly reminder that there’s an uneven playing field, and straight, white men are generally trash,” on May 27, 2016. Both Witt and Duca have verified Twitter accounts.

[source: Twitter user @Femmefeministe]
[source: Twitter user @laurenduca]
Teen Vogue’s website lists Witt as an author and Duca as a weekend editor. While both face a ton of backlash via Twitter from Teen Vogue fans and critics alike (more on that later!), Heat Street noticed something suspect about Witt in particular. In an article titled “Feminist writer Lara Witt’s very un-woke Twitter history,” Joe Simonson points out several cases in which the Teen Vogue author spewed highly hypocritical sentiments.

“Witt is a master at this social justice warrior pastime…When she’s not writing riveting columns at publications like Teen Vogue entitled ‘What I learned from DAPL protestors as a woman of color,’ or ‘Stop weaponizing ciracial children,’ at Wear Your Voice Magazine she’s letting the internet know just how terrible everybody and everything is,” Simonson writes.

“But what about Witt herself?  Has she always acted with the same kind of purity she demands from others?”

When it comes to body shaming, a concern among feminists, Witt is guilty of it herself.

Per Heat Street, Witt tweeted, “Nothing bothers me more than ignorant people who think they’re smart. Well, that and fat people who take up [two] seats [on] the bus,” on April 12, 2011.

A little over a year later, Witt wrote, “The number of women in Philly that are in their early 20s and overweight is alarming. #America.”

Witt also took to Twitter to criticize a man’s outfit choice on a city street: “Come on, dude, it’s the city, put on some fucking shoes and decent attire. Fat, lazy American,” she wrote on May 30, 2012. She also included a snapshot of the man and his friend, which they clearly did not know was being taken.

[source: Twitter user @Femmefeministe via Heat Street]
Slut-shaming is another hot button issue about which feminists preach ad nauseam. Of course a social justice warrior and liberal like Witt would never participate in such misogynistic behavior–at least, that is what she wants her followers to believe.

On January 4, Witt tweeted, “You’re shamed for any sense of sexual agency and pleasure. I can’t tell you how many times I was called a whore when I was only 18.”

Simonson notes, “What about dangerous and violent gendered language against women? Surely someone like Lara would never slut-shame, right? It’s not like she’s specifically written articles attacking people who slut shamed Kim Kardashian.”

But, five years earlier she slut-shamed a fellow woman. “Wait, what?! #KimKardashian only got married for publicity? What groundbreaking news. I didn’t know she wasn’t an attention whore,” Witt wrote on October 31, 2011.

According to Simonson, “[Witt] at least she recognizes the problematic nature of using the word crazy, right?  She frequently writes columns centered around mental health and wellness.”

Not exactly. On September 15, 2011 she tweeted, “Hearing this woman’s bed bug issue while [on] the bus is driving me crazy.”

Lastly, Witt took to Twitter not once, but twice to bash “fat, male, slutty Jews,” according to Simonson.

“I find it despicable that some Jewish figures are decrying rockets being launched at them. Israel has the means to protect itself,” she tweeted on July 29, 2014.

In response to her own tweet, Witt also wrote, “Gaza has no way to protect itself from the very government that has kept it handicapped for years. Gaza is oppressed; Israel is a terrorist.”

But, let’s get back to backlash both Witt and Duca are currently facing on the social media platform. In a March 19 tweet highlighting both aforementioned racist remarks by the two Teen Vogue employees, an account called Tennessee (@TEN_GOP) wrote, “Hey @TeenVogue, care to comment on blatant racism from your employees?” Teen Vogue has yet to respond publicly.

@AM_Gwynn responds, “@TEN_GOP @TeenVogue Perhaps this needs the attention of a hate crime agency?” and “This should go viral. Teen Vogue prefers protecting real racists over profit and reputation? This is not acceptable.

@PrettyFru writes, “@TEN_GOP @TeenVogue I’m just about to my limit with this hypocrisy! Never be apologetic for being ANY color–it wasn’t your choice.”

@jtoufas says, “@TEN_GOP @TeenVogue, “Both of these tweets sound ignorant. Why does the color of skin mean anything?”

Lastly, @indigoblue65 writes, “@TEN_GOP @TeenVogue Shocked you’re allowing such hateful, racist people to write for such an influential [magazine] for teens!”

That’s not all, though. A simple search for Witt or Duca’s account on Twitter’s app or website yields a ton of criticism aimed directly at the young writers.

Retail giant Target to expand fashion departments, technology in 2017

Over the next three years Target Corp. will spend $7 billion to renovate more than 600 stores, according to WWD.

“[The stores] will look and function differently. They’ll be reconfigured with more space for fashion storytelling and table settings in home. They’ll be digitally connected,” the retail giant’s chairman and chief executive officer Brian Cornell tells WWD.

“Order pickup and bridal registry in 2018 will touch 250 stores — 600 by 2019, and that’s just the beginning.”

Target shoppers on Black Friday, 2016 [source: Target Corporate]
The renovations come on the heels of a “weak quarter,” according to KSTP.

During the past quarter, which includes the holiday season, Target’s profit fell 43 percent “with strong online sales failing to offset weakening business at its stores,” according to KSTP.

“Target’s stock tumbled more than 12 percent and rattled Wall Street, as shares in Walmart, Macy’s and other retailers fell as well.”

Cornell also tells WWD 2016 “was not our best year,” and explains that, not only will the corporation spend $7 billion on a capital investment program to combat fallen profits, it will also “sacrifice $1 billion in annual operating profit this year to grow sales faster and capture market share against better-performing rivals such as Walmart Stores Inc., as well as off-pricers such as TJ Maxx.”

Children wearing Cat & Jack, a successful new brand by Target [source: Target Corporate]
The investments in part will go towards the launch of 12 brands within the next two years, according to WWD, that will represent more than $10 billion of Target’s sales. This is thanks to the success of Cat & Jack, a new children’s brand, that is expected to produce $1 billion in sales in 2017.

“The majority will be in Target’s home and fashion categories, which represent $26 billion in combined sales,” according to WWD.

When deciding which brands to launch, Cornell explains to WWD that the corporation really listened to consumer wants and needs.

“In some cases, it will be a new branch or a relaunch of an existing brand,” Cornell tells WWD.

“The consumer told us that some of our brands have gotten a little tired and a little bit old. We’ll go from a series of labels to a collection of brands. We now have a portfolio with a lot of labels but very few brands.”

On Monday, March 6, Target’s stock closed at $56.11, falling over 16 percent from the week before. Despite this downward trend, Cornell asks shareholders to “make an investment to build a strong company for the future,” according to WWD.

“Our goal today is to demonstrate that the investments we’re making are the right decisions for the long term.”

Inside Target’s small format store at Packard’s Corner near Boston University [source: Arrowstreet]

Though Target’s net earnings for the fourth quarter, which ended January 28, “plummeted 42.7 percent to $817 million from $1.4 billion a year earlier” and “sales for the three months declined 4.3 percent to $20.69 billion,” leaving the company with “an earnings drop of 18.6 percent for the full year, to $2.74 billion, on a sales decline of 5.4 percent, to $20.6 billion,” according to WWD, it found great success in their 32 small format stores.

Cornell tells WWD that “units sales per square foot are higher than average,” and because of this, “Target is ramping up the rollout with 30 new units this year with a goal of 100 set for 2020.”

Outside a small format Target store [source: Arrowstreet]

While all 1,800 of Target’s stores “are within 10 miles of 85 percent of customers,” according to WWD, Cornell insists that the small format stores “expand the corporation’s footprint in in key urban areas and college campuses” in part because they are “customized for each community,” as opposed to the typical, full-line stores.

“In the last six months we’ve opened stores in Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn. You can expect to see more and more,” Cornell tells WWD.

“It’s time to accelerate this new format.”

When it comes to full-line stores, however, it is quality over quantity. Instead of opening in new locations, the corporation hopes to renovate “old and tired” stores that have not been updated in 10 years, according to WWD.

“Our supply chain has been a major focus,” Cornell tells WWD.

“We’re slow and we have too much inventory. We’re changing how we move product…We’ll operate with less inventory, less working capital and better shelf availability.”

Cathy Smith, Target Corp.’s executive vice president and chief financial officer, tells WWD the corporation “expects a low- to mid-single-digit decline in comparable sales and earnings per share of 80 cents to $1.” Smith also predicts earnings per share (EPS) of $3.80 to $4.20 in 2017.

“We’re positioned to deliver superior Return On Invested Capital over time,” Smith tells WWD. “Let me be clear, this will be a multiyear, multiphase program.”

Spring 2017 trends that are here to stay

Though winter is still in full force, the world of fashion is already focusing on spring trends. Already, a number of notable trends are taking over both the high fashion and street style scenes. Blogger Alicia Roddy, better known as @lissyroddyy on Instagram, takes to her multiple platforms (including YouTube, her most recent) to showcase how she styles spring’s most coveted runway looks.

This year, spring is filled to the brim with everything feminine, including frills on frills, statement-making sleeves and ladylike patterns like gingham and stripes. Many tastemakers (including the newly revamped Teen Vogue) also deemed the coming season an 80s revival, which explains the plethora of bold shoulders, waist cinchers and wear-everywhere vinyl skirts and slacks. No matter which trends you choose to take part in this spring, Lissy Roddy shows you just how to rock them.

Chloé Ready-To-Wear Spring 2017 [source: Vogue.com]
Frills: What could be more feminine than frills? Even if your style isn’t normally super girly, you can still sport frills like a street style star this season. Opt for vintage denim on bottom to complement a frilly blouse, or a tattered band tee to bring grungy vibes to a frilled skirt.

Hellessy Ready-To-Wear Spring 2017 [source: Vogue.com]
Statement sleeves: Looking for a fun finishing touch to spice up bland outfits this spring? 1980s balloon sleeves are back! Simply throw on your go-to skinny jeans and a balloon-sleeved blouse, and all your boring daytime looks are instantly reborn.

Claudia Two Piece by Reformation [source: thereformation.com]
Gingham: Once reserved for 1950s pin-up gals, gingham is now sleeker than ever. Case-in-point: Reformation’s new Claudia two-piece set. The black and white combo, which features a crop top and high-rise trousers, will easily become your weekend uniform all season long.

Talbot Runhof Ready-To-Wear Spring 2017 [source: Vogue.com]
Stripes: From seaside styles to banker stripes, the classic pattern is everywhere this season. Bold colors will allow you to take an outfit from the classroom or office to the beach, while pale blue and white banker stripes can quickly go from day to night with a shoe swap and some added sparkling jewelry.

Saint Laurent Ready-To-Wear Spring 2017 [source: Vogue.com]
One shoulder tops & dresses: Totally 80s prom styles get a modern makeover this season! While one-shoulder tops and dresses are back, they’re now available in timeless colors and they flatter more figures than their predecessors. As exhibited by Saint Laurent’s little black number picture above, there is no room in the 21st Century for tacky neons or bulky shapes.

Sally LaPointe Ready-To-Wear Spring 2017 [source: Vogue.com]
Waist cinchers: Enhance your feminine silhouette with this season’s must-have accessory: the waist cincher! This bold accessory, sometimes adorned with grommets or princess seams, has been recently spotted on the likes of Kylie Jenner and Italian-born blogger Chiara Ferragni. Wear one to add a little edge to an otherwise girly dress.